Gallery Opening: DRIFTLESS - Saturday, May 18th, 7-10pm

We are so excited to announce our next show! Please join us on Saturday, May 18th, 7-10pm for the opening night of this amazing installation. DRIFTLESS: A Collaboration of Caleb Coppock, Daphne Eck & Betni Kalk

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Collectors and scavengers at their core, the artists gathered source materials as they explored 80-acres of ridge, valley and woods in Soldiers Grove, Wisconsin located in the ‘Driftless Region’ of the Midwest.  Following a process of gathering and re-mixing natural, human-made and digital sources, they form a personal, composite perspective of this region. A close examination and slowing of pace amidst the cacophony of data unravels the playful potential of even the tiniest bits.

ARTIST STATEMENT: A collaborative project of Caleb Coppock, Daphne Eck and Bethany Kalk, "Driftless" is our art-based interpretation of 80-acres of ridge, valley and woods in Soldiers Grove, Wisconsin. Collectors and scavengers at our core, we gathered source materials as we explored property located in this ‘driftless region’ of the midwest that hadn’t been farmed in over 50 years.

Following a process of gathering and re-mixing natural, human-made and digital sources, we form a personal, composite perspective of this region. A close examination and slowing of pace amidst the cacophony of daily data unravels the playful potential of even the tiniest bits. Through our approach, we invite you to examine textures and color with care, to contemplate time passing and maybe even to linger on the subtleties of the sublime.

ABOUT SOLDIERS GROVE: Our inspiration and source materials were taken from an 80-acre farm in Soldiers Grove, a village in the Driftless Area of Wisconsin that is home to organic farmers, artists and Amish residents.

The Driftless Area is the region where Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin meet. The Driftless Area received its name for having escaped the glaciers that flattened most of the Midwest. So untouched, this preserves a large sample of what the northern and eastern United States were like before the Glacial Period.

The region has a more varied terrain than its notoriously flat and on-a-grid neighbors. Its 150-foot bluffs are made possible by uninterrupted erosion. Here, straight roads begin to curve, then turn again and again to go up or around the hills. Sunlit valleys peek sometimes peek through—but they are narrow and surrounded by forest and rocky crags.

In addition to its ridges, valleys and woods, the Soldier Grove property has a house with a nearby sauna and cabin, a barn-turned-theatre and a team of horses. Though the area is known for its many organic farms, this one hasn’t been cultivated for more than 50 years.

THE PROCESS: Our small team took several exploratory trips at different times of the year to photograph, gather ideas and materials for the exhibition. We absorbed the landscape in sun, rain and snow. Between hikes we warmed ourselves in the cabin (or the sauna), fed apples to the horses, and read back issues of The Sun.

Our beachcomber tendencies kicked in when we discovered thousands of geodes sparkling in the mud. Caleb built a stone sifter to help uncover the perfect specimen.

The exhibition includes sculptural drawings and collections of natural objects that focus on ranges of textures and colors.

BIOGRAPHIES: Caleb Coppock is a painter, sculptor, animator, designer, satellite imagery voyeur, beachcomber, and jeweler’s loupe junkie. He tirelessly searches for the glitch, the pattern, the poetic gem in what is otherwise often overlooked in this ocean of natural and digital information.

Daphne Eck is a writer, arranger and creative director. As a child, she’d try to get lost in the family almond orchard but the straight rows always led her home. Now she’s found a way to lose herself in a great story, long walk or deep thought.

Bethany Kalk is a professor, designer, painter, muralist and photographer. While growing up in the jungles of Papua New Guinea, she spent many hours submerged to her nose, watching creek creatures up close. She tracked insects, lizards and birds and watched ephemera on the forest floor decay almost overnight. Now she hunts for textures, colors and forms in the landscapes around her.

This is an event you won't want to miss.